FEATURE ARTICLE

Friday, August 12, 2022
balooy2k@gmail.com
Arizona, USA
"A DAY IN OUR SKIN: A STRUGGLE BETWEEN RACE AND RESILIENCE"

"Until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter." -Professor Chinua Achebe.

"Neocolonialism is eviler than colonialism. Neocolonialism has eaten deeper into the mental palace and consciousness of Africans." -Yahaya Balogun.

hen one of my esteemed readers, a Nigerian-Canadian Professor, Philip Alalibo, requested to use the lines quoted above in one of my published articles on NigeriaWorld, it was a humbling honor request I wholeheartedly granted.

The line was an apt quotation in his newly released book "A Day in Our Skin: A Struggle Between Race and Resilience." It is an honor that made me feel humbled, fulfilled, and encouraged.

In a nutshell, a year after I granted my request to the brilliant Canadian Professor, the masterpiece on race and other nuances of racial relations in America and Canada was published. So naturally, I placed an order for my copy. But, alas, as I perused the book during my vacation, my heart ached to see the world of Africans not changing for the better but with our collective blissful ignorance permeating our world. "A Day in Our Skin: A Struggle Between Race and Resilience" is a book whose conception and birth was enhanced and premised on the gruesome murder of George Floyd. In addition, Professor Philip Alalibo espoused his experiences with his African counterparts who prefer to be subservient to neocolonial masters and the nuances of colonialism.

It is pertinent to remember that George Floyd was an African American resident of Minnesota. He was arrested in a convenience store in 2020 for a "fake" 20-dollar note after the store attendant made a call to the Minnesota Police Department-MPD. George Floyd was racially mistreated and slayed by a White police officer-Derek Michael Chauvin of Minneapolis-PD. The death of George Floyd sparked global outrage and protests. Derek Michael Chauvin is a former white American police officer. Derek Chauvin has since been convicted and sentenced to life in prison for murder and a racial crime against George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

In his "A Day in Our Skin: A Struggle Between Race and Resilience," Professor Philip Alalibo chronicles his experiences as a black man in the conscious and unconscious biases of white people against black people in the western world. And how Africans have consistently with inferiority complex subjected themselves to the superiority complex of the white people.

Furthermore, my piece, "Neocolonialism is eviler than colonialism. Neocolonialism has eaten deeper into the mental palace and consciousness of Africans." The Canadian Professor quoted the work above in his newly minted book and formed the onus of his masterpiece and archivable book. Without being hyperbolic, African people have incapable minds of governing themselves. We see this sad axiomatic manifestation every day in the lives of African leaders.

Meanwhile, the continent of Africa is a resourceful land. African land is abundantly endowed with human capital and natural resources. But the crudity and enslavement of the physical African beings have transformed into a flurry of mental slavery. An average African will like the subservience of his low complexity to the superiority of the biased white people. This inferiority complex in the minds of a typical African is a leverage for the consciously biased and superior complex of their white contemporaries. Until African countries remove or uproot the foundational evils and machinations of brutish British colonialism and Neocolonialism, Africa will perpetually remain surreptitiously enslaved and subservient in thought process and cognition to the whims of white superiority and the western world. Hence, Professor Chinua Achebe's quotation below remains instructive to today's bleak lives of Africans: "until the lions have their own historians, the history of the hunt will always glorify the hunter." Intuitively, only a deep thinker can deconstruct the late Achebe's axiomatic expression above.

Last but not least, Professor Philip Alalibo's book elucidates suggested prescriptions on how to deconstruct and de-emphasize the mental confinement of the African people. "A Day in Our Skin: A Struggle Between Race and Resilience" is a resourceful book that will restructure and re-situate the mental formations of the Africans who are still battling and unconsciously corded with nuances of slavery, colonialism, and Neocolonialism. Professor Philip Alalibo's new book is written with professorial lucidity. The book is an explosive, instructive, educative, evocative, and conscientized read. It is a must-read for inquisitors and those who want the dismantling of racial inequality, and conscious and unconscious biases in our world.

Grab your copy and thank me later!

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